Semester

During our Spring and Fall semester, students start with a 4 week boot camp where they work on scuba skills, research methods and their knowledge of coral reef eco systems. After that, the students start collecting data for their own independent research, which they will present during a public lecture and publish as a paper in our journal Physis.

Contact hours range from 15 to 60 hours and recommended credit is 1–4 semester/1.5–6 quarter hours for each course. See individual course descriptions for details. Students must take 5 of the 6 courses offered on the program. The 2-credit Cultural and Environmental History of Bonaire course is an optional elective:

Coral Reef Ecology

frogfish_studentsCoral Reef Ecology introduces students to basic ecological and biological principles such as competition, diversity, symbiosis, disturbance, adaptation, reproduction, and recruitment as well as basic biology and identification of the major taxa living in coral reef ecosystems. This course also examines the importance of seagrass and mangrove ecosystems and gives an introduction to oceanography and planktonic communities. Scuba and snorkeling excursions to the coral reef and laboratory sessions supplement the lectures and give students practical experience. Contact hours: 60. Recommended Credit: 4 semester/6 quarter hours.

Instructor: dr. Franziska Elmer
2016-10-24T19:47:25+00:00
Coral Reef Ecology introduces students to basic ecological and biological principles such as competition, diversity, symbiosis, disturbance, adaptation, reproduction, and recruitment as well as basic biology and identification of the major taxa living in coral reef ecosystems. This course also examines the importance of seagrass and mangrove ecosystems and gives an introduction to oceanography and planktonic communities. Scuba and snorkeling excursions to the coral reef and laboratory sessions supplement the lectures and give students practical experience. Contact hours: 60. Recommended Credit: 4 semester/6 quarter hours. Instructor: dr. Franziska Elmer

Cultural and Environmental History of Bonaire

01e3a32845d9f77dbf854cad92d2e51b640e9be244This optional course seeks to introduce students to the variety of cultures and languages of Bonaire and to understand what it means to be Bonairean. Bonaire’s multicultural heritage and history are explored from prehistory through the present. The early part of the course focuses on learning Papiamentu, an endangered language, and studying the origin(s) and current status of the language. Speaking Papiamentu shows respect for the culture and opens doors to exploration of culture and environment on Bonaire that are incomparable to readings, movies and other forms of pedagogy.

The interplay between language and culture is examined; followed by the environmental and cultural changes in Bonaire from pre-history through the present, including an examination of Bonaire’s indigenous roots, the impacts of colonization, slavery, the salt industry, and post-colonial identity. A strong conservation ethic has been developed on the island of Bonaire, yet present day environmental and cultural challenges are pervasive. Bonaire’s ongoing social, political and environmental issues will be examined to deepen insights into the interplay between culture and environment.

Topics include: the island’s geological origin, slavery, cultural identity, politics, music, and natural resources. By the end of this course, students will gain a greater appreciation for and knowledge of Bonaire’s diverse history, people, religion, culture, and environment.

Contact hours: 30. Recommended Credit: 2 semester/3 quarter hours.

Instructor: Astrid Verstappen - de Jager, ma
2016-10-24T19:54:04+00:00
This optional course seeks to introduce students to the variety of cultures and languages of Bonaire and to understand what it means to be Bonairean. Bonaire’s multicultural heritage and history are explored from prehistory through the present. The early part of the course focuses on learning Papiamentu, an endangered language, and studying the origin(s) and current status of the language. Speaking Papiamentu shows respect for the culture and opens doors to exploration of culture and environment on Bonaire that are incomparable to readings, movies and other forms of pedagogy. The interplay between language and culture is examined; followed by the environmental and cultural changes in Bonaire from pre-history through the present, including an examination of Bonaire’s indigenous roots, the impacts of colonization, slavery, the salt industry, and post-colonial identity. A strong conservation ethic has been developed on the island of Bonaire, yet present day environmental and cultural challenges are pervasive. Bonaire’s ongoing social, political and environmental issues will be examined to deepen insights into the interplay between culture and environment. Topics include: the island’s geological origin, slavery, cultural identity, politics, music, and natural resources. By the end of this course, students will gain a greater appreciation for and knowledge of Bonaire’s diverse history, people, religion, culture, and environment. Contact hours: 30. Recommended Credit: 2 semester/3 quarter hours. Instructor: Astrid Verstappen - de Jager, ma

Tropical Marine Conservation Biology

tmcbThe management of tropical marine resources is an evolving, interdisciplinary science based on a concept of conservation that includes both sustainable use and environmental protection. This course addresses the following questions from a biological/ecological perspective: What is tropical marine biodiversity? Why do we need to conserve it? What are the problems that threaten this biodiversity? What are the solutions to these problems? Examples and case studies will be drawn from around the Caribbean (particularly the Bonaire National Marine Park) and tropical seas in other regions to illustrate concepts as well as the practical application of management tools.

Contact hours: 45. Recommended Credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

Instructor: Zac Kohl, ms
2016-10-24T19:58:59+00:00
The management of tropical marine resources is an evolving, interdisciplinary science based on a concept of conservation that includes both sustainable use and environmental protection. This course addresses the following questions from a biological/ecological perspective: What is tropical marine biodiversity? Why do we need to conserve it? What are the problems that threaten this biodiversity? What are the solutions to these problems? Examples and case studies will be drawn from around the Caribbean (particularly the Bonaire National Marine Park) and tropical seas in other regions to illustrate concepts as well as the practical application of management tools. Contact hours: 45. Recommended Credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours. Instructor: Zac Kohl, ms

Independent Research in Marine Ecology and Biology

Students carry out a project on a topic of their choice in one of the subject areas: coral reef ecology, marine conservation management, scientific methodology or another subject matter accepted by the instructor/advisors. The project initiates with a research proposal and culminates in a research paper that will be published in the CIEE journal Physis: Journal of Marine Science. Students learn the basic elements of the research process: finding a topic, formulating a research question, seeking answers using the appropriate field and laboratory research methods, verbalizing research results, presenting scientific research in a public forum, and publishing a scientific paper in a student journal.

Contact hours: 60. Recommended Credit: 4 semester/6 quarter hours.

Instructors: dr. Franziska Elmer and Zac Kohl, ms
2016-10-24T20:02:39+00:00
Students carry out a project on a topic of their choice in one of the subject areas: coral reef ecology, marine conservation management, scientific methodology or another subject matter accepted by the instructor/advisors. The project initiates with a research proposal and culminates in a research paper that will be published in the CIEE journal Physis: Journal of Marine Science. Students learn the basic elements of the research process: finding a topic, formulating a research question, seeking answers using the appropriate field and laboratory research methods, verbalizing research results, presenting scientific research in a public forum, and publishing a scientific paper in a student journal. Contact hours: 60. Recommended Credit: 4 semester/6 quarter hours. Instructors: dr. Franziska Elmer and Zac Kohl, ms

Advanced Scuba

dsc05786Students expand their understanding of scuba diving beyond the recreational level in order to fully participate in the scientific dive program in Bonaire. CIEE is an institutional member of the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS) and adheres to the safety program sanctioned by AAUS. Students learn techniques that improve their diving skills and learn to respond to medical emergencies in and out of the water. By completing the course and the co-requisite course Marine Ecology Field Research Methods; students gain a certification as an AAUS Scientific Diver. Students receive training for certifications in open water diving, advanced adventure diving, rescue diving and Diving First Aid for Professional Divers.

Contact hours: 15. Recommended Credit: 1 semester/1.5 quarter hours.

Instructors: Astrid de Jager and Marc Tsagaris
2016-10-24T20:06:09+00:00
Students expand their understanding of scuba diving beyond the recreational level in order to fully participate in the scientific dive program in Bonaire. CIEE is an institutional member of the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS) and adheres to the safety program sanctioned by AAUS. Students learn techniques that improve their diving skills and learn to respond to medical emergencies in and out of the water. By completing the course and the co-requisite course Marine Ecology Field Research Methods; students gain a certification as an AAUS Scientific Diver. Students receive training for certifications in open water diving, advanced adventure diving, rescue diving and Diving First Aid for Professional Divers. Contact hours: 15. Recommended Credit: 1 semester/1.5 quarter hours. Instructors: Astrid de Jager and Marc Tsagaris

Marine Ecology Field Research Methods

Students apply internationally recognized field research methods in an inquiry-driven approach to understanding tropical marine ecosystems. The course focuses on training students in field observation, data collection, record keeping, and data analysis in order to study coral reef, seagrass and mangrove communities. During the course, students conduct fieldwork using SCUBA and are involved in ongoing research projects in collaboration with the Bonaire National Marine Park. Equipment commonly used includes: compasses, transect lines, quadrats, underwater video cameras, fish survey T-bars, writing slates, benthic corers, light meters and secchi disks. Students will become familiar with photographic equipment, underwater housings, and image software. In addition to this, students learn to organize, test, and evaluate data sets and present their findings.

While the course introduces students to research diving knowledge and techniques with broad applications, it focuses on using scuba research techniques to better understand coral reef, seagrass and mangrove communities.

Contact hours: 45. Recommended Credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours.

Instructors: dr. Franziska Elmer and Zac Kohl, ms
2016-10-24T20:09:55+00:00
Students apply internationally recognized field research methods in an inquiry-driven approach to understanding tropical marine ecosystems. The course focuses on training students in field observation, data collection, record keeping, and data analysis in order to study coral reef, seagrass and mangrove communities. During the course, students conduct fieldwork using SCUBA and are involved in ongoing research projects in collaboration with the Bonaire National Marine Park. Equipment commonly used includes: compasses, transect lines, quadrats, underwater video cameras, fish survey T-bars, writing slates, benthic corers, light meters and secchi disks. Students will become familiar with photographic equipment, underwater housings, and image software. In addition to this, students learn to organize, test, and evaluate data sets and present their findings. While the course introduces students to research diving knowledge and techniques with broad applications, it focuses on using scuba research techniques to better understand coral reef, seagrass and mangrove communities. Contact hours: 45. Recommended Credit: 3 semester/4.5 quarter hours. Instructors: dr. Franziska Elmer and Zac Kohl, ms

(Scroll through the rotator for course specific information or click on the link)

Total recommended credit is 15-17 semester/22.5-25.5 quarter hours.

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